KX3 Macros

Macros in the KX3 are incredible useful. I have eight of them – a full complement. I use them to switch between using a headset, a microphone and speaker and microphone and earphones. I also use them for setting presets for voice equalisation, compression, etc.

Here’s a table of the macros  –  KX3 Macros in PDF format and KX3 Macros in Excel format

The first five macros are assigned to PF1 and they loop back. When you get to the WSJT macro another long press of PF1 will run the DX macro. The remaining three macros are are assigned to PF2 and operate in the same round-robin fashion.

If you decide to use these macros enter them in the KX3 utility from top to bottom macro one to eight.

The macro codes are all in the Elecraft Documentation but here’s a description of my macros. The elecraft documentation is sometimes not that easy to read but all the information is there.

 

 

Macro explanations

As promised, here’s an explanation of the macros that I use. The TE directive is Transmit Equalisation and the CP directive is Compression. Please bear in mind that these two are tailored to my voice as is MG.

The headset I use is the Heil Proset that I got from Elecraft when I bought my KX3. The microphone is the Elecraft MH3 hand microphone. The headphones that I use are Heil and are the same as the Proset.

Right let’s get to it…

DX macro

TE-16-16-06+00+06+12+12+09 gives me a response curve that suits my voice and the microphone element n the headset.

MD2 is operating mode USB. MG010 is microphone gain = 10. CP015 is set compression to 15 which is very high but it suites my voice. You will probably need to reduce this. Experimentation is the key here. AG010 is audio gain set to 10. PC050 is to set power to 50 watts (I have a KXP100).  SWT19 is a short press of the PRE button on the radio which toggles the preamp on and off. As the preamp will be off by the time we get back this macro we need to turn it on again.  MN110 sets the MACRO MENU FUNCTION. SWT27 selects the macro in position 2 SWH18 is a push and hold of PF1 which assigns the selected macro to PF1. MN255 exits the MACRO MENU FUNCTION.

 

HEIL macro

This macro changes the transmit equalisation to values suggested in the Heilsound web site. It also increases MIC GAIN. I don’t use this one much.

MN110;SWT20;SWH18;MN255 enters the MACRO FUNCTION MENU and assigns the macro in position 3 to PF1 and exits the MACRO MENU FUNCTION.

Elecraft macro

Again, this macro changes the transmit equalisation to suite my voice and the Elecraft MH3 microphone. It also changes the MIC GAIN and Compression.

MN110;SWT28;SWH18;MN255  enters the MACRO FUNCTION MENU and assigns the macro in position 4 to PF1 and exits the MACRO MENU FUNCTION.

PSK macro

This one sets the transmit EQ to flat, sets MIC GAIN to 10, MD6 (DATA) and DT0 (sub mode A) is to set the radio to DATA A. BW0400 is filter bandwidth in 10 Hz units. Compression is zero, power is 50W and audio gain is 20. The preamp is toggled off and the string MN110;SWT21;SWH18;MN255 assigns macro 5 to PF1

WSJT macro

This one is pretty much the same as the PSK macro. As everything is set up for digital mode I only needed to reduce AG (Audio Gain) to suite the WSJT software adjustment range.

The string MN110;SWT19;SWH18;MN255; assigns macro  1 to PF1.

 

That’s the end of the PF1 macros and what follows is the PF2 macros.

HSET macro

MN082 is the first part of setting MIC buttons and MP000 is a bit mask so 000 turns mic buttons OFF. The ML directive sets the monitor level. Power is set to 110W. The string MN110;SWT32;SWH26;MN255 assigns macro number 7 to PF2.

MIC macro

MN082 is the first part of setting MIC buttons and MP005 is a bit mask so 005 turns mic buttons ON. The ML directive sets the monitor level. Power is set to 110W. The string MN110;SWT33;SWH26;MN255 assigns macro number 8 to PF2.

M&H macro

This macro is for when I’m using headphones and the Elecraft MH3 hand mic.

MN082 is the first part of setting MIC buttons and MP005 is a bit mask so 005 turns mic buttons ON. The ML directive sets the monitor level. Power is set to 110W. The string MN110;SWT29;SWH26;MN255 assigns macro number 6 to PF2.

 

That’s the end of the description of the macros. I really, really hope that I haven’t got anything wrong that could mislead.

This set of macros means that I don’t have to do anything except press PF1 or PF2 and select the macro(s) to suit the current mode or circumstances.

Enjoy and have a play to make the best use of the KX3 abilities.

If you find any errors or see any glaring omissions PLEASE leave a comment so I can fix it.

 

 

 

 

More LAMP and WordPress

Well there have been some “developments” since I got LAMP and WordPress going.

I’ve tried and abandoned an e-mail server.

I’ve decided that 500GB of storage isn’t enough given our collection of “stuff” – you know, pictures, movies, TV series (Medici is good), music, etc. so I got my grubby fingers on a couple of 2TB Sandisk Extreme SSD drives. Using the same procedure I used to move the /root partition from the SD to the 500gb SSD I moved the /root partition again to a 2TB SSD. I left it as a single, big partition and made a mount point for the second 2TB SSD and put that in fstab using PARTUUID. I moved the contents of our ancient NAS drive onto that. It makes a huge difference to have a share (Samba and NFS) on a 1Gb network connection rather than the old 100baseT connection.

We now have more than enough storage for our foreseeable needs and it’s fast too. I’ll have to get a four port, powered USB 3 hub though. Copying downloaded stuff over the network or via USB 2 is slooooow compared to USB 3.

Meanwhile the Pi 4 4GB keeps on rocking along.

Getting e-mail happening

So I had this brainwave and thought it’d be a good idea to set up a Pi as an e-mail server. After all, how hard could it be, there are hundreds of thousands of mail servers around the globe that work well. What could possibly go wrong ?

I started out trying to keep it simple. I’m pretty familiar with Sendmail but I figured that I’d go with something simple as I was only going to serve two users and Sendmail seemed a lot of overkill.

After a bit of searching Citadel seemed to fit well. I installed it and configured but there is no way I could get past a couple of errors not the least if which is “db:cursor still in progress on cdb 02: attempt to write during a r/o cursor”. I tried a completely fresh install of Raspbian Buster with a brand new install of Citadel. Still no dice. Searched for more comprehensive doco but, again, to no avail. I reckon I just about wore out the search engines looking for a solution but still no illumination. I even tried downloading the source and buildin it from scratch. The same olf “db:cursor still in progress…” error persisted.

Scratch Citadel which is a pity really as I reckon it’d be the bees knees for a simple and small e-mail server.

On to Dovecot and Postfix. I had a few issues but by carefully following the documentation on Postfix.org I had it all up and running. In the beginning I had a lot of trouble getting “saslauthd” to do the authentication and I spent a goodish amount of time trying to treat the symptoms without success. At this point I decided to get rid of postfix and dovecot and start again from a new install of both. The big difference this time was that I folloed the docs on postfix.org to the letter. Surprise, surprise it all worked as it should.

After years and years of telling people to RTFM I didn’t.Once I did RTFM I proved my own point yet again.

Now came the hard part. DNS records. I use a dynamic DNS which has served me very well thus far. Setting up the MX record was very easy but I discovered I needed a PTR (for reverse lookups) and this is where the gremlins started to creep in. I needed a static address. No problem just ask my ISP, right ? Easily doable, for another ten bucks a month. Sign the static IP over to the dynamic DNS provider so that they can use it for all DNS records. ISP says – “oh no we can’t do that”. Luckily my dynamic DNS provider has a facility that can easily get around that particular scenario.

Now that it all works, I’m happy and am quite willing to advocate for the Postfix / Dovecot sulution. It’s a lot easier to configure than Sendmail. The configuration files are well commented and make sense, unlike Sendmail.

If you’re considering setting up your own mail server first check that you can get a PTR DNS record. If you can’t look for another solution. If you can, RTFM and pay attention to the details and recommendations.

Just for fun and games on our internal network I set up a DNS complete with MX and PTR records and with the internal e-mail system configured to insist on reverse lookups it worked perfectly with no errors. Of course this was only with two Pi’s, two PC’s and two windows tablets. I’ve got rid of it all now I know how to make it work and that there’s no point with an uncooperative ISP.

What to do with a second Pi

As the title asks – what to do with a second Pi ? I “accidentally” ended up with a Raspberry Pi 4 1GB to partner my 4GB unit so what to do with it.

The original Pi has LAMP installed and running well. It’s also got 1TB of storage for all my videos and photo’s and stuff and we use it to watch movie’s and TV series using our lounge room TV as the monitor. It works really, really well so I’m quite reluctant to change anything. It does need a fan heatsink though, to keep the temperatures under control. With the fan it only gets up to 55deg C max.

I have a USB DVB-T/2 dongle as well as a Pi TV hat. The TV hat doesn’t fit on my 4GB Pi because I have a fan case on it and a couple of the GPIO pins are used to power the fan. The TV Dongle was pressed into service and works OK with TV Headend. It’s not as sensitive as the Pi Hat despite using the same chipset so I pressed an RF amplifier into service in the antenna cable and it works a treat.

So. In the lounge room, behind the TV I have the 4GB Pi with a TV dongle and a 1TB SSD  with all my stuff attached. In the bedroom, where there’s no antenna socket, I have a smaller TV and a Pi 1GB. The Pi, using VLC, can play the TV from the lounge room Pi running TV Headend and using Samba can also play, using VLC again, all of our shows and movies.

Given that we’ve got good WiFi 5GHz coverage throughout the house thanks to a couple of WiFi extenders, for our grandson and visitors all I need to do to give them HD TV and shows and movies is to move the Pi and give them a keyboard. Our grandson can watch his Youtube stuff to his hearts content without annoying us.

Seeing as how successful that is I reckon another Pi to use for the same purpose in the BBQ area out the back could be the go. Watching the cricket while we’re having a BBQ and a few beers sounds pretty appealing to me. Setup is easy – Latest Raspbian with VLC, power supply and HDMI cable. Seems a bit of a waste of a Pi 4 though. I’ll have to have a look at the specs and get a few opinions of the capabilities of “lesser” and cheaper Pi’s and maybe get a couple more.

Moving the root partition.

This a summary of an article describing how to move the root partition found on the Raspberry Pi Forums .

Before you do anything do a “lsusb”without your external storage plugged in. Then plug in your external storage and do a “lsusb” again to make sure that your storage is going to work OK.

Before you start give a bit of thought as to how you want your storage partitioned. I just left my SSD as a single 500GB partition. In the future I can see that I’ll be adding more to house my collection of music and videos.

Anyway, without further ado, if you follow this guide  to the letter I’m quite sure you’ll have no problems.

LAMP + WordPress

This is not intended to be a complete HOWTO for Linux (Raspbian), Apache2, PHP, MySQL and  WordPress on a Raspberry Pi 4 4GB. What it is supposed to be is a guide that demonstrates that it is easy to get LAMP + WordPress going on a Pi with some links to the documentation that I used.

Assuming you’ve got your Pi and possibly some external storage it’s important to plan out what you’re trying to accomplish and how you want to go about it.

So, I had a 4GB Pi4 as well as a Sandisk Extreme external SSD. First step was to get the latest Raspbian (Buster) in an SD card and booting. Once that was accomplished I installed Apache2 and got that working properly. MySQL / MariaDB was the next cab off the rank followed by PHP and php-mysql.

After each step it’s a damn good idea to make good and sure that what you’ve just installed works properly.

Downloading and installing WordPress was quite possibly the easiest part of the whole process.

For each of the LAMP components there is a heap of available documentation available – remember that Google is your friend. The Raspberry Pi Forums are a brilliant resource. The MariaDB documentation is comprehensive to say the least as is the PHP documentation. There is more WordPress documentation than any mortal could ever want.

So, the steps I followed were :-

  1. Get Raspbian working.
  2. Download, install and get Apache2 working.
  3. If you are going to get SSL working this is when you’d do. I decided not to and just skipped it.
  4. Download and get MariaDB installed and working.
  5. Get PHP and php-mysql downloaded, installed and working.
  6. Get the latest version of WordPress downloaded and installed.
  7. In MySQL reate the WordPress user and the WordPress database.
  8. Set up the privileges for the user.
  9. Configuring WordPress is pretty trivial IF you follow the WordPress procedures.

This is a much more complete HOWTO.

Once I got it all working I set about getting all my stuff over from an ISP’s server. Lots of copying and pasting is all it took.

Once I got it all over I started messing around with WordPress themes and layouts. The choices are bewildering and the theme and layout of this site is a “first attempt mess” which I’ll refine as I work out what I want and how to get there.

At this point I decided that a 32GB SD card probably wouldn’t be enough so I decided to press a Sandisk Extreme 500GB SSD into service. I found a great HOWTO on the  Raspberry Pi Forums and it worked first time. I’ll put that procedure into another post.

Radio and Raspberry Pi

I still haven’t got my radio set up but I’m working on it. Playing with a Pi seems to have taken precedence for the time being. The major obstacle is getting an antenna up and the co-ax run. All in good time though.

I was thinking that when I get the radio set up I’d like to play around with the Pi and KX3 hooked together. Maybe some FT-8, PSK, etc. Maybe one (or two) of those new fangled D-Star / C4FM dongles.

Seeing as I use my current Pi as a web server / storage box for movies and TV series and it will soon have a TV tuner HAT or dongle attached it lives right by the TV. If I’m going to use a Pi for radio stuff it looks like I’ll need to get another Pi.

There’s lots of thinking about it all in the works at the moment but very little actual action. Getting this web site happening the way I want it to seems to have taken priority. Of course other bits of life get in the way too.

Getting rid of the heat

So when I use the Pi to watch movies on our TV it tends to get a bit hot under the collar – up to around 81 or 83degC. Something needed to be done about that state of affairs so I installed it in a heatsink case with fans.

Pi with heatsink case with fans.

Much better. No matter what I do I can’t get the temperature over 55degC.

While I was at it I decided to go with the 64 bit kernel so I added arm_64bit=1 to config.txt so now uname -a gives me :-

Linux markpi 4.19.75-v8+ #1270 SMP PREEMPT Tue Sep 24 18:59:17 BST 2019 aarch64 GNU/Linux

Everything still works as it should – Apache2, PHP, MySQL and VLC which we use a lot for movies, tv series, etc.

The next step is a TV HAT or a TV USB dongle – probably the dongle as that won’t mean messing around with GPIO standoffs, etc to get it to fit with the heatsink.

Travelling and playing radio

When we’re out and about I always have the KX3 and stuff with me. I leave the PX3 at home though. I power it all with a home built 10Ah LiFePo4 battery which gives me quite a while at 50W from my KXPA100.

Antenna is usually a doublet of about 50 feet / leg and fed with 300 ohm TV antenna twin lead. Needless to say some sort of impedance matching is required so I use a home brew Z-match ATU. The centre of the doublet is at around twenty feet on a squid pole.

Sometimes I use a 53 foot wire which is end fed via a 9:1 unun with about 20 or 25 feet of counterpoise. I prefer the doublet though. Another antenna I use a bit is 50 feet of zip cord with one conductor stripped off at 35 feet. Both antennas work pretty well for what they are just heaved into a tree if there’s one available. No trees ? I use the doublet.

One of my projects (apart from all the others) is to get a Pi 3 together for FT-8 and PSK and logging and do some really compact portable digital stuff – the thought of lugging a laptop and associated stuff around just doesn’t apeal.

VK3KW

Located in Moe Victoria, Australia in grid square QF31dt. Moe is located about 130km’s south east of Melbourne in the Latrobe Valley in South and West Gippsland.

My station consists of an Elecraft KX3 (serial 1675) with all the trimmings – KX3, Roofing Filter, 2 metre module, ATU and charger/real time clock. I also have a KXPA100 (0530) with inbuilt ATU and a PX3 (233).

My antenna is a 43 foot vertical with a few counterpoise wires with  an LDG RT/RC 100 at the base. I wish I could have a tower with a Yagi but as we are renters that’s not an option. On the boundary of the property there’s a great big Eucalypt about 30 metres tall which will quite possibly be pressed into service for one end of a random sloper of some description.

I also have a Yaesu VX-7R, a Yaesu FRG100, a Yaesu FT-817 (non ND) and an old Eddystone EB35 MKII in perfect working order apart from a bit of deafness on FM.  Sooner or later I’ll get around to fixing that though. Of course I have sundry small portable receivers – mostly Sony.

When I get around to it I’ll put up a few photos – probably about when I get around to fixing the Eddystone.